Alima (1)

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Alima grece unguentum vel linimentum. Cassius felix capitulo de causone alima lexiperiton .i. permixtio ad febres et cetera. Item liber de doctrina greca per geminum .M. alimma habet.


Apparatus:

.i. ACH efjp | & est B
permixtio | perunctio Cassius Felix
febres | febrẽ f
et cetera om. e
alimma (alĩma AC) ABCH fjp | almima .i. ms. e


Translation:

Alima is Greek for Latin unguentum or linimentum {"ointment" or "liniment"}. Cassius Felix in his chapter De causone {"On the causos fever"} speaks of alima lexipyreton (lit. "fever-allaying ointment"}, i.e. a mixture for fighting fevers, et cetera. The word is also mentioned in the liber de doctrina greca but there it is spelt with double 'm': alimma.


Commentary:

Alima:
Greek ἄλειμμα /áleimma/ is a derivate of ἀλεíφω /aleíphō/, which means "to anoint the skin with oil". ἄλειμμα /áleimma/ therefore means "anything used for anointing, unguent, fat, oil" (LSJ). Simon’s transcription reflects the medieval itacist pronunciation /álima/.

lexiperiton
Greek ληξιπύρετον /lēxipýreton/ means "allaying fever" and it is a compound of λῆξις, /lêxis/ "cessation; death" from /λήγω /lḗgō/ "to stay, abate" + πυρετός /pyretós/ "fever". The itacist pronunciation of this word is /lixipíreton/ but Latin speakers of Romance background still pronounced Greek ”η” as /e/. The expected transcription by Simon would be *lexipireton,

Source:
Simon refers explicitly to Cassius Felix De medicina, chapter 61. Ad causon {"On causos fever"}, ed. Fraisse (2001: 166-171), §§ 4,5, (2001: 168), where it says § 4: Alimma lexipyreton id est perunctio ad febres aestatis tempore... - "Alimma lexipyreton {'fever-allaying ointment or liniment'} is an ointment for the summer fevers"...

§ 5: Alia perunctio lexipyretos, ad causon et ad iugem sive continuam febrem, quam Graeci synochon dicunt... - "Another ointment is called lexipyretos {lit. 'allaying fever'}, for causos fever, and for unintermittent or continual fever, which the Greeks call synochon"...
N.b. σύνοχος /sýnokhos/, from συνέχω /synékhō/ "to hold or keep together", is already used in the Corpus Hippocraticum in the sense of "unintermittent fever".
The Latin text is also available online in the Rose edition (1879: 150f) [[1]].


The liber de doctrina greca has so far not been identified.


WilfGunther (talk) 07/02/2014


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