Difference between revisions of "Askincor"

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<span style="color:#3CB371">Translation:</span>
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<span style="color:#3CB371">Apparatus:</span>
  
Askincor ACD ef | Askinchor B
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In ''ms''. p this entry is added seamlessly on to the text of the entry ''Askil''. <br />
 
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Askincor ACD efj | Askinchor B | askicon {‘s’ inserted by a different hand} <br />
stincus ABCD f | stinckus e
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stincus | stinckus ''ms''. e
  
  
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<span style="color:#3CB371">Commentary:</span>
 
<span style="color:#3CB371">Commentary:</span>
  
Siggel (1950: 14): ﺍﺳﻗﻧﻗﻮﺭ /isqanqūr/ Scincus officinalis, Skunx {i.e. "skink lizard"}.
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''Askincor'': <br />
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Siggel (1950: 14): ﺍﺳﻗﻧﻗﻮﺭ /isqanqūr/ Scincus officinalis, Skunx {i.e. "skink lizard"}. Simon's form shows vowel metathesis: */asqinqūr/. This lemma is ultimately a loan from Greek, see below.
  
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''scincus''/ ''stincus'': <br />
 
'c' misread as 't' in ''scincus''. The misreading ''stincus'', e.g. present in all of Simon's witnesses, was common; even Linnaeus named the animal erroneously Lacerta stincus [sic|]   
 
'c' misread as 't' in ''scincus''. The misreading ''stincus'', e.g. present in all of Simon's witnesses, was common; even Linnaeus named the animal erroneously Lacerta stincus [sic|]   
  
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''scincus'': <br />
 
Latin ''scincus/scincos'' is adopted from Greek σκίγγος /skíngos/, σκίγκος /skínkos/, English skink; it is "a kind of lizard found in Africa and the East, used in medicine" (LSJ).
 
Latin ''scincus/scincos'' is adopted from Greek σκίγγος /skíngos/, σκίγκος /skínkos/, English skink; it is "a kind of lizard found in Africa and the East, used in medicine" (LSJ).
  
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<span style="color:#3CB371">Zoological identification:</span>
 
<span style="color:#3CB371">Zoological identification:</span>
  
It is most likely ''Scincus scincus'', Linnaeus (1758) , syn. ''Scincus officinalis'' by several authors, cf. Siggel (1950). [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scincus_scincus]]
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It is most likely ''Scincus scincus'', Linnaeus (1758) , syn. ''Scincus officinalis'' by several authors, cf. Siggel (1950). [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scincus_scincus]].
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[[User:WilfGunther|WilfGunther]] ([[User talk:WilfGunther|talk]]) 11:40, 22 December 2016 (GMT)
  
  
 
<div style="text-align: right; direction: ltr; margin-right: 1em;">[[Askil | Next entry]]</div>
 
<div style="text-align: right; direction: ltr; margin-right: 1em;">[[Askil | Next entry]]</div>

Revision as of 12:40, 22 December 2016

Askincor arabice stincus.


Apparatus:

In ms. p this entry is added seamlessly on to the text of the entry Askil.
Askincor ACD efj | Askinchor B | askicon {‘s’ inserted by a different hand}
stincus | stinckus ms. e


Translation:

Askincor is Arabic for Latin stincus {"skink lizard"}.


Commentary:

Askincor:
Siggel (1950: 14): ﺍﺳﻗﻧﻗﻮﺭ /isqanqūr/ Scincus officinalis, Skunx {i.e. "skink lizard"}. Simon's form shows vowel metathesis: */asqinqūr/. This lemma is ultimately a loan from Greek, see below.

scincus/ stincus:
'c' misread as 't' in scincus. The misreading stincus, e.g. present in all of Simon's witnesses, was common; even Linnaeus named the animal erroneously Lacerta stincus [sic|]

scincus:
Latin scincus/scincos is adopted from Greek σκίγγος /skíngos/, σκίγκος /skínkos/, English skink; it is "a kind of lizard found in Africa and the East, used in medicine" (LSJ).


Zoological identification:

It is most likely Scincus scincus, Linnaeus (1758) , syn. Scincus officinalis by several authors, cf. Siggel (1950). [[1]].


WilfGunther (talk) 11:40, 22 December 2016 (GMT)


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