Baccha

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Baccha et lauri et olive et edere et forte aliquarum aliarum arborum fructus dicunt his similes verum sepius lauri et edere sed edere aliquando bachar invenitur.


Apparatus:

Baccha AC f | Bacha B | Baoacha e

et (& AC) oliue et (& AC) edere ABC f | oliue edere e

his AC | hiis B ef

et (et om. e) edere sed edere B e | et edere sed edere f | & edere (sed edere om.) AC

inuenitur (-it~ A e) AC e | ĩueĩtur B | dicit~ f


Dahhaoui (2001: 209) established the same text on the basis of his collations, except for the omission of sed edere;

Baccha et lauri et olive et edere et forte aliquarum aliarum arborum fructus dicunt his similes verum sepius lauri et edere aliquando bachar invenitur.

and he notes these vvll. - not all shown - for: baccha] bacha, baoacha; edere] hedere; lauri] lauari; edere] hedere; edere] sed edere add.; bachar] bacchar


Translation:

Baccha they call the fruits of laurus {"laurel"}, oliva {"olive"} and edera {"ivy"} and of any trees that are similar to these, most often it refers to "laurel" and "ivy", but for those of the "ivy" the expression bachar is sometimes found.


Commentary:

Latin baca, often written bacca or baccha, denotes a "small round fruit, a berry", Lewis & Short (1879). The word is like many other words that relate to viticulture of Mediterranean origin. As Ernout & Meillet (2001: 62), s.v. bāca, the phonetic and semantic closeness of the word to the name of the Greek god Bacchus is tempting.

Wilf Gunther 01/03/14


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