Empima

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Empima grece saniei collectio in pectore, Cassius felix, empyma vel empuma dicunt greci collectiones sive apostemata occulta atque visu carentia vel absconsa in altioribus viscerum partibus nata, nam greci encatalipsim vocant et cetera.


Apparatus:

Empima ABC fp | Empinia ms. e | Empinia or Empmia j
{felix} empyma AC | empiema {-pie- p; Empiema rubricated in j} B fjp | empima ms. e
{vel} empuma (empúma p ) ABC fp | ẽpunia j | empuna e
{greci} .g. add. j
sive | sine ms. e
occulta AC fjp | oculta B | oculorũ ms. e
visu AC | visui B efp | ĩ sui j
carentia | carencia ef
altioribus ABC p | alcioribus efj
viscerum ABC ef | uixetũ j {'sc' misread as 'x'; 'e' misread as 't'} | uixetũ superscript corrected by different hand: scerum p {read: uiscerum}
partibus om. B
nata | natũ p
encatalipsim f | encataplisim ms. e | eucatalipsim B | eutata lypsim j | eurtataliysim p | est catelipsim C | eã catelipsiʒ A
et cetera om. f


Translation:

Empima is Greek for an accumulation of diseased matter in the chest. Cassius Felix says: empyma or empuma is the name the Greeks give to accumulations of diseased matter in the chest or imposthumes that are concealed and hidden from view and out of sight growing in the upper parts of the entrails; that's why the Greeks call it encatacalipsim et cetera.


Commentary:

Empima/ empyma/ empuma:
Greek ἐμπύημα /empýēma/, pl. ἐμπυήματα /empyḗmata/ is defined by LSJ as a "gathering, abscess, esp. internal; … {also} of the kidneys, of the chest". The word consists of the prefix ἐν- /en-/ in its variant ἐμ- /em-/ before /p/, {"inside"} + πυ- /py-/ the root meaning "pus, matter", therefore meaning "internal pussy matter".

Only Simon's witnesses B fjp have among their variants a more precise transcription: empiema, bearing in mind the late Greek {and Latin} sound change υ > ι {/y/ > /i/}, resulting in /empíema/. Forms like empyma are simply the result of a misreading. Empuma shows the rare rendering of late Greek υ {/y/} by the letter "u" and is most likely due to a scribal error rather than signalling any different pronunciation.

encatalipsim:
The Greek expression at the end of the entry, which is badly transcribed by most witnesses, is the expression ἐν κατακαλύψει /en katakalýpsei/ - itacist: /en katakalípsi/ - , here meaning "in concealment, not visible, internal" < κατακάλυψις /katakálypsis/ "covering, concealment". Simon treats *encata<ca>lipsis as a single Greek-derived noun which consequently needs to be given an accusative ending depending on vocant: encatalipsim.

Source:
After a brief definition of the word empima Simon goes on to quote verbatim the more detailed elaboration by Cassius Felix De medicina, 21, 1, ed. Fraisse (2001: 40). Ad empyemata: Empyemata dicuntur collectiones sive apostemata occulta atque visu carentia vel absconsa et in altioribus viscerum partibus nata: nam Graeci en catacalypsi vocant - "Empyemata is {in Greek} the name for accumulations of diseased matter in the chest or imposthumes that are concealed and hidden from view and out of sight growing in the upper parts of the inwards; that's why the Greeks call it en catacalypsi".
The Latin text is also available online in the Rose edition (1879: 32 ) [[1]].


The word empyema (pyothorax) has survived into modern medical terminology and is defined as "pus in the pleural cavity, usually secondary to infection in the lung or in the space below the diaphragm." (Martin, 1985)


WilfGunther (talk) 11:30, 17 November 2016 (GMT)


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