Eucrista

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Eucrista vocantur grece liquida que illiniuntur quale est quod fit ad ulcera purganda et implenda, Cornelius celsus.


Apparatus:

Eucrista (-crista p) AC ep | Euchrista B f

vocantur (-t~ ms. e; -cãtur A) AC e | uocãt~ p | uocatur (-t~ f) B f

illiniuntur(-ũtur C e) AC e | illiniunt~ p | liniũtur (-unt~ f) B f | inlinuntur Celsus

implenda AC f | inplenda ep | ĩplẽda B


Translation:

Eucrista is the Greek name for certain medicinal fluids that are rubbed in. One such is prepared for cleaning and making the flesh grow in ulcers, says Cornelius Celsus.


Commentary:

Simon is referring to Celsus, 5, 25, ed. Spencer (1935-8: II.58-61); or in the CML edition, Marx (1915: 211f). [[1]].

The original text reads: Enchrista autem Graeci vocant liquida, quae inlinuntur. Quale est, quod fit ad ulcera purganda et inplenda, which Spencer p. 59 translates: "Now enchrista is the Greek name for liquid applications … Of these one is used for cleaning and filling up ulcers …"

This entry owes its existence to a very early misreading of 'u' instead of 'n'. The correct word is found in Simon's entry Enchrista with a shorter quote from Celsus; the fuller quote is found here in Eucrista. The mistake can easily be made since Greek has the prefixes /en-/ as well as /eu-/ the latter meaning "good" etc., both of which are very common. Whether Simon himself was a victim of this error or whether it was the fault of an early copyist is difficult to say; at any rate both "versions" of the word appear in all witnesses. It seems that nobody was aware of the identity of the two entries.

WilfGunther 20:54, 4 December 2014 (UTC)

For the etymology of the word see Enchrista.

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