Euzomum

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Euzomum grece eruca ut Dyascorides capitulo de stringno manicon liber de doctrina greca euzomon et est expositio eius bonum salsamentum nam zomon ius salsamentum.


Apparatus:

Euzomum (-muʒ f) AC f | Euzomiuʒ (-miũ B) B e

capitulo B | cappitulo e | cao f | capi. AC

stringo manicon e | scrignomanicon B | scrigo manicon f | stringno. ezanicon AC | Strigno/ Strignus manicon Diosc.Longob. | στρύχνον μανικόν /strýkhnon manikón/ Diosc. Graece

liber ABC | liber e | lio f

expositio (-positio B) eius bonum (-nuʒ A; -nũ e) ABC e | bona exp͡o f

zomon (-mõ C) ABC f | zamon e


Translation:

Euzomum is Greek for Latin eruca {"salad rocket"} as Dyascorides says in his chapter De strigno manicon. In the liber de doctrina greca the word euzomon is mentioned and it is said that it is good for a sauce or condiment; zomon in Greek is in Latin ius {"broth, soup"} or salsamentum {"condiment"}.


Commentary:

εὔζωμον /eúzōmon/ is the Greek name for Eruca sativa {"rocket"} (LSJ), it means literally "making good broth" for reasons mentioned in Simon's entry. The word is a compound of εὐ- {"good"} + ζωμός/ zōmós/ {"soup, broth"}.

Simon alludes ultimately to Dioscorides Longobardus, 4, 69, ed. Stadler (1901: 39-40). De strigno manicon; for the Greek original see 4, 73, ed. Wellmann (1906-14: II.231-2) στρύχνον μανικόν /strýkhnon manikón/ meaning lit. "mad making strychnon {possibly a nightshade?}", see Strignus. In the description of this plant the original Greek text simply says, Wellmann (1906-14: II.232) : φύλλον ἐστὶν εὐζώμῳ παραπλήσιον /phýllon estìn euzṓmō paraplḗsion/ "its leaf {i.e. that of στρύχνον μανικόν /strýkhnon manikón/} is somewhat like {lit. coming near} that of euzomon", but in the Longobardic Dioscorides the translator adds this, no doubt to help the Latin speakers to identify the plant: Folia eius euzomo id est eruca similia sunt – "the leaves of this plant {i.e. strignon manicon} are similar to euzomon, which is eruca". Simon could possibly have consulted Dyascorides alphabeticus, cf. the somewhat corrupted Bodmer ms. f 64v [[1]]: Strignus camcon … folia hʒ enzomo & eruce sil'ia.

The liber de doctrina greca has so far not been identified.


Botanical identification:

See Eruca. See also: Gergir, Iergir

Wilf Gunther 11/11/2013


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